How to Kill a City: Gentrification, Inequality, and the Fight for the Neighborhood

Bold Type Books - The deceptively simple question of who can and cannot afford to pay the rent goes to the heart of America's crises of race and inequality. The very future of American cities as vibrant, equitable spaces hangs in the balance. Peter moskowitz's how to kill a city takes readers from the kitchen tables of hurting families who can no longer afford their homes to the corporate boardrooms and political backrooms where destructive housing policies are devised.

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The New Urban Crisis: How Our Cities Are Increasing Inequality, Deepening Segregation, and Failing the Middle Class—and What We Can Do About It

Basic Books - A bracingly original work of research and analysis, The New Urban Crisis offers a compelling diagnosis of our economic ills and a bold prescription for more inclusive cities capable of ensuring growth and prosperity for all. Our winner-take-all cities are just one manifestation of a profound crisis in today's urbanized knowledge economy.

And yet all is not well, Richard Florida argues in The New Urban Crisis. Florida, one of the first scholars to anticipate this back-to-the-city movement in his groundbreaking The Rise of the Creative Class, unaffordability, demonstrates how the same forces that power the growth of the world's superstar cities also generate their vexing challenges: gentrification, segregation, and inequality.

The New Urban Crisis: How Our Cities Are Increasing Inequality, Deepening Segregation, and Failing the Middle Class—and What We Can Do About It - Meanwhile, many more cities still stagnate, and middle-class neighborhoods everywhere are disappearing. Basic. In recent years, the young, educated, and affluent have surged back into cities, reversing decades of suburban flight and urban decline.





The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America

Liveright - While urban areas rapidly deteriorated, the great American suburbanization of the post–World War II years was spurred on by federal subsidies for builders on the condition that no homes be sold to African Americans. Yet recent outbursts of violence in cities like Baltimore, Ferguson, and Minneapolis show us precisely how the legacy of these earlier eras contributes to persistent racial unrest.

One of publishers weekly's 10 best books of 2017 longlisted for the National Book AwardThis “powerful and disturbing history” exposes how American governments deliberately imposed racial segregation on metropolitan areas nationwide New York Times Book Review. In this groundbreaking history of the modern american metropolis, income differences, Richard Rothstein, a leading authority on housing policy, through individual prejudices, explodes the myth that America’s cities came to be racially divided through de facto segregation―that is, or the actions of private institutions like banks and real estate agencies.

13 illustrations Basic. Rather, the color of law incontrovertibly makes clear that it was de jure segregation―the laws and policy decisions passed by local, state, and federal governments―that actually promoted the discriminatory patterns that continue to this day. Through extraordinary revelations and extensive research that ta-nehisi coates has lauded as "brilliant" The Atlantic, showing how this process of de jure segregation began with explicit racial zoning, Rothstein comes to chronicle nothing less than an untold story that begins in the 1920s, as millions of African Americans moved in a great historical migration from the south to the north.

The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America - As jane jacobs established in her classic the death and Life of Great American Cities, it was the deeply flawed urban planning of the 1950s that created many of the impoverished neighborhoods we know. Now, rothstein expands our understanding of this history, showing how government policies led to the creation of officially segregated public housing and the demolition of previously integrated neighborhoods.





The New Urban Crisis: How Our Cities Are Increasing Inequality, Deepening Segregation, and Failing the Middle Class—and What We Can Do About It

Basic Books - Meanwhile, many more cities still stagnate, and middle-class neighborhoods everywhere are disappearing. We must rebuild cities and suburbs by empowering them to address their challenges. The new urban crisis is a bracingly original work of research and analysis that offers a compelling diagnosis of our economic ills and a bold prescription for more inclusive cities capable of ensuring prosperity for all.

Richard florida, the young, and affluent have surged back into cities, educated, confronts the dark side of the back-to-the-city movementIn recent years, one of the world's leading urbanists and author of The Rise of the Creative Class, reversing decades of suburban flight and urban decline. In the new urban crisis, such as gentrification, demonstrates how the forces that drive urban growth also generate cities' vexing challenges, Richard Florida, one of the first scholars to anticipate this back-to-the-city movement, segregation, and inequality.

The New Urban Crisis: How Our Cities Are Increasing Inequality, Deepening Segregation, and Failing the Middle Class—and What We Can Do About It - And yet all is not well. Basic. Richard rothstein, a leading authority on housing policy, explodes the myth that America's cities came to be racially divided through de facto segregation; it was actually de jure segregation.





The New Localism: How Cities Can Thrive in the Age of Populism

Brookings Institution Press - Where rising populism on the right and the left exploits the grievances of those left behind in the global economy, new localism has developed as a mechanism to address them head on. New localism is not a replacement for the vital roles federal governments play; it is the ideal complement to an effective federal government, and, currently, an urgently needed remedy for national dysfunction.

In the new localism, katz and Nowak tell the stories of the cities that are on the vanguard of problem solving. Katz and nowak imagine a world in which urban institutions finance the future through smart investments in innovation, infrastructure and children and urban intermediaries take solutions created in one city and adapt and tailor them to other cities with speed and precision.

The New Localism: How Cities Can Thrive in the Age of Populism - As katz and nowak show us in The New Localism, “Power now belongs to the problem solvers. Basic. Indianapolis is governing its city and metropolis through a network of public, private and civic leaders. Pittsburgh is catalyzing inclusive growth by inventing and deploying new industries and technologies. Richard rothstein, a leading authority on housing policy, explodes the myth that America's cities came to be racially divided through de facto segregation; it was actually de jure segregation.

Copenhagen is using publicly owned assets like their waterfront to spur large scale redevelopment and finance infrastructure from land sales. Out of these stories emerge new norms of growth, and finance and a path toward a more prosperous, governance, sustainable, and inclusive society.





Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City

Broadway Books - Its unforgettable scenes of hope and loss remind us of the centrality of home, without which nothing else is possible. New york times bestseller | winner of the national book critics circle award for nonfiction | winner of the pen/john kenneth galbraith award for nonfiction | winner of the andrew carnegie medal for excellence in nonfiction | finalist for the los angeles times book prize | winner of the 2017 hillman prize for book journalism | winner of the chicago tribune heartland prizenamed one of the best books of the year by the new york times book review • the boston globe •  the washington post • npr • entertainment weekly • the New Yorker • Bloomberg •  Esquire • Buzzfeed • Fortune • San Francisco Chronicle • Milwaukee Journal Sentinel • St.

Winner of the 2017 pulitzer prize for general nonfiction in evicted, princeton sociologist and macArthur “Genius” Matthew Desmond follows eight families in Milwaukee as they struggle to keep a roof over their heads. Hailed as “wrenching and revelatory” the nation, “vivid and unsettling” New York Review of Books, Evicted transforms our understanding of poverty and economic exploitation while providing fresh ideas for solving one of 21st-century America’s most devastating problems.

Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City - Louis post-dispatch •  politico •  the week • bookpage • kirkus reviews •  amazon •  barnes and noble review •  Apple •  Library Journal • Chicago Public Library • Publishers Weekly • Booklist • Shelf Awareness Basic. Richard rothstein, a leading authority on housing policy, explodes the myth that America's cities came to be racially divided through de facto segregation; it was actually de jure segregation.





The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America

Liveright - Exploding the myth of de facto segregation arising from private prejudice or the unintended consequences of economic forces, Rothstein describes how the American government systematically imposed residential segregation: with undisguised racial zoning; public housing that purposefully segregated previously mixed communities; subsidies for builders to create whites-only suburbs; tax exemptions for institutions that enforced segregation; and support for violent resistance to African Americans in white neighborhoods.

13 illustrations Basic. One of publishers weekly's 10 best books of 2017 longlisted for the National Book AwardThis “powerful and disturbing history” exposes how American governments deliberately imposed racial segregation on metropolitan areas nationwide New York Times Book Review. A groundbreaking, “virtually indispensable” study that has already transformed our understanding of twentieth-century urban history Chicago Daily Observer, The Color of Law forces us to face the obligation to remedy our unconstitutional past.

The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America - . Widely heralded as a “masterful” washington post and “essential” slate history of the modern American metropolis, state, Richard Rothstein’s The Color of Law offers “the most forceful argument ever published on how federal, and local governments gave rise to and reinforced neighborhood segregation” William Julius Wilson.

Richard rothstein, a leading authority on housing policy, explodes the myth that America's cities came to be racially divided through de facto segregation; it was actually de jure segregation. Broadway.





In Defense of Housing: The Politics of Crisis

Verso - Verso. They look at the causes and consequences of the housing problem and detail the need for progressive alternatives. Rather, the housing crisis has deep political and economic roots—and therefore requires a radical response. And the bene fits of decent housing are only available for those who can a fford it.

Basic. In every major city in the world there is a housing crisis. The housing crisis cannot be solved by minor policy shifts, they argue. In defense of housing is the de finitive statement on this crisis from leading urban planner Peter Marcuse and sociologist David Madden. Pro fit has become more important than social need.

In Defense of Housing: The Politics of Crisis - How did this happen and what can we do about it?Everyone needs and deserves housing. The poor are forced to pay more for worse housing. But today our homes are being transformed into commodities, making the inequalities of the city ever more acute. Communities are faced with the violence of displacement and gentri fication.

Richard rothstein, a leading authority on housing policy, explodes the myth that America's cities came to be racially divided through de facto segregation; it was actually de jure segregation. Broadway.





Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design

Farrar, Straus and Giroux - A globe-trotting, eye-opening exploration of how cities can―and do―make us happier peopleCharles Montgomery's Happy City is revolutionizing the way we think about urban life. Rich with new insights from psychology, and Montgomery's own urban experiments, neuroscience, Happy City reveals how cities can shape our thoughts as well as our behavior.

Richard rothstein, a leading authority on housing policy, explodes the myth that America's cities came to be racially divided through de facto segregation; it was actually de jure segregation. Broadway. After decades of unchecked sprawl, more people than ever are moving back to the city. Farrar Straus Giroux.

He meets the visionary mayor who introduced a "sexy" bus to ease status anxiety in Bogotá; the architect who brought the lessons of medieval Tuscan hill towns to modern-day New York City; the activist who turned Paris's urban freeways into beaches; and an army of American suburbanites who have hacked the design of their own streets and neighborhoods.

Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design - But is it better or worse for our happiness? are subways, and condo towers an improvement on the car dependence of the suburbs? The award-winning journalist Charles Montgomery finds answers to such questions at the intersection between urban design and the emerging science of happiness, sidewalks, during an exhilarating journey through some of the world's most dynamic cities.

Basic. The message is ultimately as surprising as it is hopeful: by retrofitting cities and our own lives for happiness, we can tackle the urgent challenges of our age. The happy city can save the world―and we can all help build it.





The Death and Life of Great American Cities

Vintage - She writes about the salutary role of funeral parlors and tenement windows, the dangers of too much development money and too little diversity. Compassionate, and always keenly detailed, bracingly indignant, Jane Jacobs's monumental work provides an essential framework for assessing the vitality of all cities.

A direct and fundamentally optimistic indictment of the short-sightedness and intellectual arrogance that has characterized much of urban planning in this century, The Death and Life of Great American Cities has, since its first publication in 1961, become the standard against which all endeavors in that field are measured.

The Death and Life of Great American Cities - Verso. The death and Life of Great American Cities. Farrar Straus Giroux. In prose of outstanding immediacy, jane jacobs writes about what makes streets safe or unsafe; about what constitutes a neighborhood, and what function it serves within the larger organism of the city; about why some neighborhoods remain impoverished while others regenerate themselves.

Richard rothstein, a leading authority on housing policy, explodes the myth that America's cities came to be racially divided through de facto segregation; it was actually de jure segregation. Broadway. Basic.





The Divided City: Poverty and Prosperity in Urban America

Island Press - The death and Life of Great American Cities. Verso. It is neither a dystopian narrative nor a one-sided "the cities are back" story, but a balanced picture rooted in the nitty-gritty reality of these cities. The divided city is imperative for anyone who cares about cities and who wants to understand how to make today’s urban revival work for everyone.

Basic. Mallach makes a compelling case that these strategies must be local in addition to being concrete and focusing on people’s needs—education, jobs, housing and quality of life. Richard rothstein, a leading authority on housing policy, explodes the myth that America's cities came to be racially divided through de facto segregation; it was actually de jure segregation.

The Divided City: Poverty and Prosperity in Urban America - Broadway. What does this mean for these cities—and the people who live in them? in the Divided City, as they have undergone unprecedented, Cleveland, Detroit, and Baltimore, urban practitioner and scholar Alan Mallach shows us what has happened over the past 15 to 20 years in industrial cities like Pittsburgh, unexpected revival.

Mallach explores the pervasive significance of race in American cities and looks closely at the successes and failures of city governments, nonprofit entities, and citizens as they have tried to address the challenges of change. The divided city offers strategies to foster greater equality and opportunity.

Farrar Straus Giroux. This is the first book to provide a comprehensive, grounded picture of the transformation of America’s older industrial cities.